Eisner-nominated Magdalene Visaggio has teamed up with artist Sonny Liew to create Eternity Girl, for Young Animal Comics. Young Animal is an imprint of DC Comics founded in 2016, developed in collaboration with Gerard Way, of Umbrella Academy fame. Its main focus is to relaunch characters and settings from the DC Universe in stories for mature readers, done with a more experimental approach than DC’s primary line of superhero comics. Young Animal comics are about relationships between parents and children, alienation, fame, change, bullying, and teenagers.

Eternity Girl certainly fits well within that portfolio. Eternity Girl is weird and difficult but I’m getting sucked into its strange little world. The basic idea of the comic book is that Eternity Girl, real name Caroline, has been saving the world as part of a secret government organization called Alpha 13, but her powers went haywire and Alpha 13 kicked her out. Now, feeling useless and distant from the world, Caroline desperately wants to die. Except, her powers won’t let her.

One thing that helps you slide into this dark concept is that the comic book is beautifully drawn and colored. It is an attractive and disciplined grid of muddy shades of avocado, salmon and ice blue. The way this story is told is cool, too. It introduces itself quickly and smoothly, so quickly in fact that the characters and situations start to feel familiar, even by the end of issue one. Eternity Girl is only up for a six-issue run, which probably explains the fast pace of the storytelling. But despite moving along at a fast canter, the writing has an honesty and observational character to it that is refreshing. For example Eternity Girl and her nemesis have a complex relationship, but one that immediately feels close. Like a young woman and a mother that is still in her life.


Galaxy Dog (Dark Galaxy) Start Reading the Dark Galaxy Trilogy

The first book in the Dark Galaxy Trilogy, always the best place to start, is Galaxy Dog. It’s a little more old-school and fun than a lot of the sci-fi that is around at the moment. It has spaceships, robots, battles, and brave warriors rebelling against an evil empire. Click the book cover and go to the storefront you prefer to buy it now, or follow this link.



These are the basics, but there is an awful lot of other stuff going on, too. For example, the comic book keeps switching us between different realities. We spend most of our time in the real world but we also flit off to what I’m guessing are the more imaginary environments conjured by Eternity Girl’s own mind. I’m not sure, because the comic book doesn’t spoon feed you information, but its a likely enough explanation. Anyway, when what I assume are mental breaks are taking place, the art gets a textured canvas look to it, like it is a faded page of a four color 1970’s comic book. It’s effective and really helps the storytelling.


I decided to spoil myself a little bit after reading issue three and go onto the Interwebs to research what the hell is going on in this comic book. I found an article with some hints on CBR.com.

CBR says that Endless Girl is a character created in 1956, who is given shape-shifting powers by a magical Mesopotamian ziggurat, and reinvented multiple times over the years. There was a gritty, violent Watchmen-style deconstruction in the ‘80s, followed by the psychedelic Chrysalis: The Eternity Girl in the early ‘90s. Except, none of that really happened. The DC/Young Animal crossover “Milk Wars,” then allowed Eternity Girl to escape from this fictional past into the real DC Universe.

Caroline refers to an event from her own life as being “in the now-famous Alpha 13 #27.” Moments like these hint at how the metafictional aspects of Eternity Girl’s concept will play into this story, but they remain hints. We get just a couple of brief flashes back to these non-existent comics.


Luckily, you don’t need to have read any of “Milk Wars” to follow this story, because I haven’t and I’m enjoying the book. Even so, there are other elements that could be off putting. For example, Caroline is insufferably whiny and self-involved. She’s had it rough, sure, and she absolutely has every reason to be depressed, but her attitude makes the comic a difficult read in places. Uproxx agrees with my reservations, I think, because they say:

Eternity Girl is a person we can feel for but not always like.

I was worried for a while that this claustrophobic story wasn’t going to widen out. Reading issue one, I was worried that the whole thing would take place in Eternity Girl’s bedroom and her psychiatrist’s consulting room. For a while issue two looks like it is going down the same route but then it suddenly exhales and opens out. To get spoilery about it, what happens is Eternity Girl’s arch nemesis turns up -which is weird because she’s dead - and tells Eternity Girl that the only way to kill herself is to kill the whole universe. I smiled as I read that, because from a philosophical point of view, I wonder if there is any difference between the two. It shows Eternity Girl’s state of mind is more than just shaky, because she considers this lunacy for a while, and then actually ends up going along with it.


The question the comic book is asking is what a suicidal superhero powerful enough to shatter planets would do in order to die? And who would they take down with them?

Obviously, destroying the entire universe is not the sort of thing a superhero should be doing, but it does take the comic to some interesting places. Namely – space. Eternity Girl is taken to an old-school representation of space, complete with Kirby black dots, colorful starscapes, and even a planet with a face. In this environment, she meets a character that is meant to be similar to Galactus, by the looks of him. I’m sort of half certain this is a kind of dream sequence, or maybe it isn’t. I don’t know for sure, but I do know it is cool and I want to see more of this kind of stuff.

When I’m not reading comics, I’m writing my own books, such as the sci-fi novel Galaxy Dog, check it out below.


Galaxy Dog (Dark Galaxy) Start Reading the Dark Galaxy Trilogy

The first book in the Dark Galaxy Trilogy, always the best place to start, is Galaxy Dog. It’s a little more old-school and fun than a lot of the sci-fi that is around at the moment. It has spaceships, robots, battles, and brave warriors rebelling against an evil empire. Click the book cover and go to the storefront you prefer to buy it now, or follow this link.